Comparing Health Systems in the U.S. and Canada

A recent paper from NBER by June E. O’Neill and Dave M. O’Neill compares health outcomes and equitability of resources in the U.S. and Canada. Here is the abstract:

Does Canada’s publicly funded, single payer health care system deliver better health outcomes and distribute health resources more equitably than the multi-payer heavily private U.S. system? We show that the efficacy of health care systems cannot be usefully evaluated by comparisons of infant mortality and life expectancy. We analyze several alternative measures of health status using JCUSH (The Joint Canada/U.S. Survey of Health) and other surveys. We find a somewhat higher incidence of chronic health conditions in the U.S. than in Canada but somewhat greater U.S. access to treatment for these conditions. Moreover, a significantly higher percentage of U.S. women and men are screened for major forms of cancer. Although health status, measured in various ways is similar in both countries, mortality/incidence ratios for various cancers tend to be higher in Canada. The need to ration resources in Canada, where care is delivered “free”, ultimately leads to long waits. In the U.S., costs are more often a source of unmet needs. We also find that Canada has no more abolished the tendency for health status to improve with income than have other countries. Indeed, the health-income gradient is slightly steeper in Canada than it is in the U.S. [Emphasis added.]

2 responses to “Comparing Health Systems in the U.S. and Canada

  1. Pingback: Health Tips » Blog Archive » Comparing Health Systems in the US and Canada

  2. I wish I could see more of this article, as my research doesn’t support those findings at all…

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